Claremore Daily Progress

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February 1, 2013

DA Steidley targets CPD officer with Giglio

DA must defend accusations

CLAREMORE — District Attorney Janice Steidley has questioned a police detective’s credibility as a witness in a 2011 rape case, prompting objections from city officials and the detective, who says it could cost him his job.

Steidley recently mailed information to defense attorneys regarding Claremore Police Detective John F. Singer’s role in the rape conviction that involved the defendant admitting guilt in a videotaped interview with the detective.

Steidley says she must disclose the information because of U.S. Supreme Court rulings that force prosecutors to turn over information that could help defendants refute the credibility of government witnesses, including police.

The withheld evidence - called Giglio material in reference to a 1972 Supreme Court case - can scar a police officer’s reputation.

Singer filed a motion Tuesday in Rogers County District Court to contest Steidley’s action, saying he was “informed by his superiors that if the material is, in fact, Giglio material, his employment with the Claremore Police Department will be terminated.” City officials also filed a similar motion to intervene.

Singer and city officials are asking for a hearing before a judge to determine the validity of Steidley’s information in the rape case, which potentially could lead to appeals of convictions in other cases the District attorney Janice Steidley has questioned a police detective’s credibility as a witness in a 2011 rape case, prompting objections from city officials and the detective, who says it could cost him his job.

Steidley recently mailed information to defense attorneys regarding Claremore Police Detective John F. Singer’s role in the rape conviction that involved the defendant admitting guilt in a videotaped interview with the detective.

Steidley says she must disclose the information because of U.S. Supreme Court rulings that force prosecutors to turn over information that could help defendants refute the credibility of government witnesses, including police.

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