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Hurricane Maria with top winds of 120 miles (193 kilometers) per hour, was 60 miles east of Martinique and bearing down on Dominica and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean's Leeward Islands, the National Hurricane Center said in an 11 a.m. advisory.

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A more expansive checkup is part of a pioneering effort in Vermont to keep people healthy while simplifying the typical jumble of private and public insurers that pays for health care. The underlying premise is simple: Reward doctors and hospitals financially when patients are healthy, not just when they come in sick.

Brian Chaney of Farmington Hills, Michigan, said a teacher consultant forced his 11-year-old son, Stone, to stand for the pledge late last week at East Middle School. Chaney called the action a violation of his son's civil rights, explaining that Stone had been making a personal decision not to salute the American flag - but to honor God and his family - for the past several years.

Hurricane Jose churned toward the U.S. Northeast and could cause swells along the coast by midweek, according to the National Hurricane Center, while Norma is aiming for Mexico's Baja California and a new system is gathering strength in the Caribbean as a busy tropical weather season grinds on.

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Smaller cities across the U.S. want their chance to vie for Amazon's newly announced second headquarters. The HQ2, as Amazon is calling it, is expected to hire 50,000 highly paid workers and invest some $5 billion in construction and operation. 

On average, 23 children were shot each day in the United States in 2015, according to a Post review of the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. That's at least one bullet striking a growing body every 63 minutes.

In total, an estimated 8,400 children were hit, and more died — 1,458 — than in any year since at least 2010. That death toll exceeds the entire number of U.S. military fatalities in Afghanistan this decade.

Many incidents, though, never become public because they happen in small towns or the injuries aren't deemed newsworthy or the triggers are pulled by teens committing suicide.

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The Environmental Protection Agency plans to reconsider parts of an Obama-era effort to regulate potentially toxic waste known as coal ash, again siding with energy-industry efforts to slow or reverse standards put in place in recent years.

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Talk of a deal could put hardliner legislators in the difficult position of deciding whether to support a deal struck by a president who won their state, even if it incurs the wrath of conservatives opposed to any compromise over DACA recipients.

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When the pioneers arrived at Independence Landing, they reassembled their wagons and journeyed six miles south to Independence Square where they acquired supplies, made repairs, and joined other emigrants to form wagon trains and head to Oregon or California.

Retail prices for specialty prescription drugs widely used by older Americans ballooned by an average of 9.6 percent between 2014 and 2015, the highest increase since at least 2006, while retail prices for some generic drugs saw more mixed results, with 11 percent showing price increases according to two new AARP Public Policy Institute reports released Thursday.

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As residents in north Florida and south Georgia began assessing the damage left behind by Hurricane Irma, officials in both states briefly considered closing one of the nation’s busiest interstate highways as a swollen river threatened to engulf a small bridge near Gainesville, Fla.

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Bishop Woods, a Murray State defensive lineman, and his fiancee, Caitlin Myers, were looking for someone to marry them and, when Racers offensive line coach Brian Hamilton mentioned to Woods that he happens to be an ordained minister, the time - a Tuesday afternoon - and the place - the 50-yard line at Roy Stewart Stadium - were perfect. 

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With Hurricane Irma finally coming to an end, millions of people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Alabama are left without power. Although power outages can be inconvenient for many, for others outages pose serious and sometimes fatal threats. In a Florida nursing home, 6 residents died and 100 were evacuated after the facility lost power.

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CAPE CORAL, Fla. - Millions of Floridians grappled with the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on Wednesday, confronting a sweltering reality: More than 40 percent of Florida still lacked electricity, and for some of them, the lights might not come back on for days or even weeks.