Claremore Daily Progress

November 28, 2013

Let us give thanks for all our blessings and then some

Randy Cowling
Editor

CLAREMORE —

Let us gather our thoughts and give thanks for the many blessings we have received.
With family and friends surrounding the table filled with the bounty of great cooks, we must pause to reflect upon the year gone by and remember the people, circumstances and events that have shaped our lives.
Many have been expressing thanks all month. Are you one of those who took the 30 Days of Thanksgiving challenge? It is a Facebook movement that encourages individuals to post what they are thankful for each day of November.
Personally, I didn’t jump on the bandwagon. It has been interesting to see some of my Facebook friend’s postings.
Some take it seriously and give thoughtful remarks. I have seen some pretty lame remarks as the month has lingered.
While in graduate school, we were encouraged to journal. We were required to write our thoughts about what we did, what we observed and the challenges we faced.
I found it took much discipline to keep up with the daily journal. After a long day of work and study, setting down to scribble a few lines in a journal winds up becoming a low priority.
Laboring at the end of each day on our reflections was a good thing. Pushing us to write it down was an effort to make it a habit. A habit is something that begins as a tedious task and over time can become natural if you overcome the tediousness.
Journaling is still something I turn to on occasions, but it is not part of my natural daily routine.
I saw that in the various Facebook postings during November. For some it was tedious; others it was a natural thing.
Being thankful should not be regimented. Giving thanks should flow naturally from the lips. Our actions should reflect how we are thankful.
It’s been a year since I lost my father. It was sudden. Though he had fought an ongoing illness, the end came quickly, leaving me with a hole in my life. However, I am thankful for the life lessons he taught me.
It is those lessons — some good and some not so good — I lean on as I make my way on this journey alone.
The memories of times with my parents and their parents are always present for which I am thankful. Gathering together for card games and late night talks on my grandparent’s front porch are comforting and bring a smile to my face.
Thanksgiving is much more than a tender turkey, tasty dressing and delicious pecan pie. It is more than who gets the drumstick, or which football team wins.
Thanksgiving is about the ones you love and cherish. It is a time to take stock of those relationships and ways to make them stronger and deeper for the years to come. Once you have lost those relationships, the memories will be all that you have left. While being thankful for what we have, we must work to make the most of while we have it.
It is time to give thanks for all our blessings and even then some.
Happy Thanksgiving.
Randy Cowling is editor of the Claremore Daily Progress.