Claremore Daily Progress

Our View

February 26, 2013

Many federal jobs could be eliminated

WASHINGTON D.C. — With Congress facing sequestration like nearly every other federal agency, I conducted a top to bottom review of my office and eliminated seven full time positions over the past year while sending back more than $242,800 in office budget authority.  While this has required doing more with less, we have succeeded in maintaining the same quality of constituent services and level of representation with a leaner team.

Sequestration will require managers of other agencies to make similar decisions, and with smart leadership and a thoughtful re-evaluation of missions and setting of priorities, the quality of services can similarly be preserved.
At the same time the administration is warning sequestration could force laying off or furloughing U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents, Defense civilian employees, or food safety inspectors, the federal government is also soliciting applicants for numerous lower priority jobs.  Not filling the jobs advertised in just these ten vacancy announcements could save as much as $1.4 million that could be redirected towards more essential jobs being targeted for sequestration savings:
·A staff assistant at the Department Of Labor to answer phones, salary range from $51,630 to $81,204 per year;
·Ten drivers for the State Department, pay ranges from $22.76 to $26.45 per hour.
·A policy coordinator for the Department of Health and Human Services to attend and facilitate meetings and coordinate policies within the department, salary range from $51,630 to $81,204 per year;
·A Director for the Air Force History and Museums Policies and Programs to provide guidance of historical matters throughout the Department of the Air Force, salary ranges from $143,600 to $165,300 per year;
·An analyst for the Legislative Affairs Office of the Marine Corps to provide representation to Capitol Hill, salary range from $80,000 to $90,000 per year;
·A director for the Government Employee Services Division of the Department Of Agriculture improve services to federal employees,  salary ranges from $119,554 to $179,700 per year;

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