Claremore Daily Progress

November 6, 2013

Claremore one step closer to mobile technology

CPD, CFD and Animal Control to benefit from new software

Salesha Wilken
Claremore Progress

CLAREMORE — Claremore’s digital transformation to add mobility to the tools officers and staff use received approval Monday by unanimous vote of the city council.

Chief Stan Brown and his staff presented the new system to the council last week. The software system is the first phase of the project anticipated to costa bout $400,000.

The product will extend benefits beyond CPD adding services for Claremore Fire Department and Animal Control.

Not only will it improve public safety, but provides tools to increase officer and firefighter safety, according to Brown.  CPD will move away from a pen and paper system, which requires hand written notes to be transcribed multiple times.

“We are purchasing software and training to get the system up,” said City Manager Jim Thomas.

This software will be paid from the 911 restricted fund, according to Mayor Mickey Perry.

Perry has worked with Brown to save the funds need for the system for several years.

Once the system is in place a yearly service contract will be used to maintain the software.

“We are confident the 911 yearly fees will sustain this system, Thomas said.

The city has saved 911 fees to pay for the proposed Spillman Technologies software designed to streamline the more than 23,000 calls for service the department handles annually.

Brown said those calls translate into about 3,000 written reports and the current record system is 14 years old, outdated and lacks the tools to meet the department’s needs.

Currently, officers collect information on the scene then come back to the office to complete a report.  The new system will save time, fuel and improve safety, according to Brown.

Before selecting Spillman Technologies, the department looked at 16 vendors.  Eleven included an in-depth review of their products by employee democratic committee process, according to Brown.

Bids were solicited from a number of companies, according to Attorney Matt Ballard.