CDC links Salmonella outbreak in 35 states to raw turkey products

A Salmonella outbreak has sickened people across 35 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control. (Source: Pixabay)

WASHINGTON, DC (WCSC) - The Centers for Disease Control says a Salmonella outbreak has now made 164 people sick across 35 states.

The latest numbers show the outbreak killed one person in California and sent 63 others to the hospital across the country.

One case has been reported so far in South Carolina, according to the CDC report. Seven cases have been reported in North Carolina and two cases have been reported in Georgia.

The outbreak has affected people in 35 states. (Source: CDC)

Five states -- California Illinois, Minnesota, New York and Texas -- have the highest number, reporting between 11 and 17 cases.

Laboratory evidence indicates raw turkey products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Reading and are making people sick.

“The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading has been identified in various raw turkey products, including ground turkey and turkey patties,” according to a release from the agency. “The outbreak strain has also been found in raw turkey pet food and live turkeys, indicating it might be widespread in the turkey industry.”

But the report has not yet identified a single, common supplier of raw turkey products that could be the source of the infected meat.

The CDC offered the following advice to consumers:

  • Always handle raw turkey carefully and cook it thoroughly to prevent food poisoning.  
  • CDC is NOT advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey products, or that retailers stop selling raw turkey products.
  • General ways you can prevent Salmonella infection include good handwashing and cooking turkey to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.  Thaw turkeys in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
CLICK HERE for more prevention advice.

In most cases, people who come into contact with Salmonella get sick in 12 to 72 hours after swallowing the germ and experience diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps.

Most people recover within a week, but some illnesses can last longer and be more severe.

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