Scouts

Cherokee National Treasure Bow Maker, Richard Fields presents to Cherokee Citizen and Sequoyah District of Boy Scouts of America for the Indian Nations Council, Terry Hancock four bows to be used during the O. A. Lodge Cherokee ceremonial education presentations.

Claremore's is the only Boy Scout O.A. Lodge to use all authentic Native American Works in their ceremonial activities.

This is according to pack leader Terry Hancock, who said the local scouts are celebrating the recent donation of four bodark wood bows.

Bow

Hancock said the bows were presented by Cherokee National Treasure bow maker Richard Fields.

"The bows are made of bodark wood and can take 40 to 50 man hours to create," Hancock said, adding that the donation included an Eastern style bow and an Oklahoma style bow.

"The Boy Scout O. A. Lodge is currently working off of a grant I wrote from the Cherokee Nation presented by Cherokee Counselor Keith Austin, to be used in our ceremonial activities and public education of Cherokee culture, history and language," Hancock said. "The Boy Scout O. A. Lodge is currently working off of a grant I wrote from the Cherokee Nation presented by Cherokee Counselor Keith Austin, to be used in our ceremonial activities and public education of Cherokee culture, history and language."

He said the bows will be utilized beginning with the annual Arrow of Light ceremony where cub scouts graduate to a boy scout troop on Feb. 9.

When asked why they've made authenticity a priority, Hancock said, "Too many O.A. Units used materials that were not indicative of Native Americans, what we called TV Indians and I wanted to see that changed. So I went to the Cherokee Nation and asked for their help. This work has been going on now for over two years."

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