What is was, no one knows. If they do, no one is confirming the source of a “boom” heard by hundreds of Rogers County residents on Saturday evening.

Local authorities have no explanation for the loud noise resembling an explosion, heard throughout Claremore and surrounding areas.

Claremore Police Chief Stan Brown said he did not hear the “boom,” however, dispatch received several calls from residents as far south as the Port of Catoosa and as far north as Foyil who said the noise was loud enough that it shook their house.

“We did our due diligence to determine the source of the explosion,” said Brown. “We contacted neighboring departments and military sources, but they had no information.”

The noise was described to dispatchers as a large explosion similar to an airplane breaking the sound barrier, a sonic boom.

“If the explosion was land-based from an industrial park, we would have heard about it, especially if there was an emergency,” said Brown.

Rogers County Emergency Management Director Scotty Stokes said he has been asked about the mystery explosion by numerous residents, but has no information or speculation as to what it could have been.

“To my knowledge, there was no emergency in Rogers County caused by an explosion at that time,” said Stokes.

Stokes said he did not hear a noise, however, from what others described he is not sure what could have caused something of that magnitude.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, since March 1973, supersonic flight over land by civil aircraft has been prohibited.

A sonic boom is produced by a plane traveling as speeds greater than that of sound (approximately 717 mph).

The shock wave created by the sonic boom is heard from the ground as a loud explosion.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, since March 1973, supersonic flight over land by civil aircraft has been prohibited. Military aircraft, such as the F-14, F-16, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and the T-38 are allowed to break the sound barrier as long as they are at an elevation higher than 10,000 feet.

The Tulsa Air National Guard flies F-16 fighters and the Air National Guard in Enid flies T-38 Talons.

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